Do Workers in Jobs Threatened by Automation Prefer More Demanding Welfare Policies?

This blog is based on an article in the Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy by Zhen Im. Click here to access the article. Automation has permeated the workplace in advanced economies and this trend may accelerate in a post covid-19 world. Although there is burgeoning research on its electoral implications, we still know little about… Continue reading Do Workers in Jobs Threatened by Automation Prefer More Demanding Welfare Policies?

The Politics of Unequal Childcare Expansion: An Illustration of the German Case

This blog is based on an article in the Journal of Social Policy by Erik Neimanns. Click here to access the article. In their manifestos for the 2021 federal election in Germany, the two major parties of the center-right and center-left, the Christian Democratic CDU/CSU and the Social Democratic SPD, promise to expand the provision… Continue reading The Politics of Unequal Childcare Expansion: An Illustration of the German Case

Welfare Professions as the Overlooked Actors of Welfare States

This blog is based on an article in the Journal of Social Policy by Kathrine Carstensen, Viola Burau, Hanne Marlene Dahl and Andreas Nielsen Hald. Click here to access the article. The predominant view of welfare professions like social workers, nurses and teachers is that they are often on the receiving end of welfare reforms:… Continue reading Welfare Professions as the Overlooked Actors of Welfare States

Activating Sick-Listed Workers: The Role of Employers in Comparative Perspective

This blog is based on an article in Social Policy and Society by Thomas Leoni. Click here to access the article. Health is an important determinant of employability and labour market inclusion, especially in societies characterised by an ageing workforce. In recent years, we can observe an increasing policy focus on residual work ability. Numerous… Continue reading Activating Sick-Listed Workers: The Role of Employers in Comparative Perspective

How Important was the Economy to the Effectiveness of Welfare Reform?

This blog is based on an article in the Journal of Social Policy by Marilyn Edelhoch, Cynthia Flynn and Qiduan Li. Click here to access the article. The short answer is “Very Important”.  The purpose of this study was to answer two research questions. First, what was the impact of participation in South Carolina’s Temporary Assistance… Continue reading How Important was the Economy to the Effectiveness of Welfare Reform?